The ASPCA Announces ID Your Pet Day!

Our friends at the ASPCA asked if we would help  to remind pet owners that with warmer temps and sunshine, more time is spent outdoors, which poses an added risk of pets escaping. It is our pleasure to help spread the word!! To help keep pets safe this season, the ASPCA has created ID Your Pet Day on July 1st – a holiday to raise awareness about the importance of ID tagging your pet. This holiday is especially timely as July 4th is a time of year when many pets go missing due to fireworks.

ASPCA INFOGRAPHIC

 

ePole Allows those who lose a pet – as well as those who find a missing pet – post the pet’s vital information and get in contact with others, 24 hours a day

HELP KEEP PETS SAFE THIS SUMMER WITH THESE TIPS

FROM MICHIGAN HUMANE SOCIETY

MHS’ online ePole can help lost pets find their way home

 Independence Day is just around the corner, and that means more and more families across metro Detroit will be enjoying the spectacle of fireworks. But these pyrotechnics can be very frightening for our four-legged friends, who are able to do some pretty remarkable and potentially dangerous things in an effort to escape the loud noises and bright lights. The Michigan Humane Society (MHS) is reminding pet owners to keep their pets safe by ensuring they are well-secured, have up-to-date identification and license tags, and are microchipped.

 

Of the more than 10,000 stray pets arriving at MHS each year, only a fraction – about 10% -– have any form of identification. Without ID, the chance that these pets will be reunited with their families is small. MHS strongly recommends that pets have both visible ID tags and a microchip.

 

Microchipping is a safe, permanent and unalterable way for your pet to be identified at veterinary centers and animal shelters around the country. MHS offers microchipping for dogs and cats for approximately $50, by appointment at each of the organization’s three veterinary centers in Detroit (313-872-0004), Rochester Hills (248-852-7424) and Westland (734-721-4195). MHS even also includes no-cost microchipping with all its cat and kitten adoptions.

 

For those pets who do go missing, MHS offers an online tool called the ePole, which acts as a virtual telephone pole for public use, allowing those who lose a pet – as well as those who find a missing pet – to post the pet’s vital information and get in contact with others, 24 hours a day. The service is free to use, providing residents with a means to upload photos of the missing pet, post descriptions of the animal, and share the location where the animal was last seen or found. The ePole can be found online at www.michiganhumane.org/lost.

dakota july 4 2011 adorable

MHS also recommends the following tips to keep pets safe during Independence Day festivities:

  • Keep pets inside and secure. Frightened animals may jump tall fences, bolt out gates or run through screens during fireworks displays in order to “escape.”

 

  • Resist the urge to take dogs to firework displays.  Even those who are normally unflappable may be frightened by sudden, loud noises and may run off.

 

  • If you know your pet is afraid of loud noises, confine him in a safe, quiet room with their favorite toy and comfortable bedding.

 

  • If your dog shows signs of distress, give him a peanut butter-stuffed toy to help distract him and calm his nerves. Playing soft music may also help relieve the animal’s stress.

 

  • The holiday is often accompanied by hot weather.  Prevent heat exhaustion by keeping pets inside in a cool area during the heat of the day, with plenty of fresh, cool water.

 

For more information about pet safety, please visit www.michiganhumane.org.

michigan-humane-logo

 

The Michigan Humane Society is the largest and oldest animal welfare organization in the state. MHS works to end companion animal homelessness, provide the highest quality service and compassion to the animals entrusted to our care, and to be a leader in promoting humane values.

 

 

Poisonous Plants for Dogs

Back on June 1st I was reading a post written by one of my favorite cat blogs, which was about Poisonous Plants for Cats.

Back in 2010 on Cat Chat with Caren and Cody (at that time it was Cat Chat), I had blogged about a little boy who had contacted me wanting me to spread the word about plants that are poisonous to cats, because he had lost his cat after it had nibbled on an Easter Lily plant that was on their dining room table.

squirrel in lettuce July 2011

When I shared the most recent post, (Poisonous Plants for Cats), on Facebook,  a  dear friend of mine asked if I would please post a list of plants that can be dangerous and even lethal for dogs as well.

While we must let our dogs sniff and investigate their surroundings, it is imperative that we know exactly what they are ingesting, it COULD save their life.

Here is a list I found that was on PetMD….read and take note and possibly adjust your homes and yards accordingly.

Be safe out there!

FROM PetMD:

The following plants are the most toxic to dogs and should never be made available to them under any circumstances:

 

  • Castor bean or castor oil plant (Ricinus communis)
  • Cyclamen (Cylamen spp.)
  • Dumbcane (Dieffenbachia)
  • Hemlock (Conium maculatum)
  • English Ivy, both leaves and berries (Hedera helix)
  • Mistletoe (Viscum album)
  • Oleander (Nerium oleander)
  • Thorn apple or jimsonweed (Datura stramonium)
  • Yew (Taxus spp.)
  • Any mushroom you cannot identify as safe

These types of vegetation are to be avoided for a variety of reasons. Do not plant them near your home or bring them inside as plants or cut flowers:

  • Amaryllis (Amaryllis spp.)
  • Autumn crocus (Colochicum autumnale)
  • Bleeding heart (Dicentra spectabilis)
  • Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)
  • Chrysanthemum (Compositae spp.)
  • Flower bulbs of any kind
  • Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)
  • Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum)
  • Larkspur (Delphinium)
  • Lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis)
  • Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
  • Peace Lily or Mauna Loa Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum spp.)
  • Pothos (both Scindapsus and Epipremnum)
  • Rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum)
  • Schefflera (Schefflera and Brassaia actinophylla)
  • Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica)
  • Tulip/Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa/Narcissus spp.)
  • Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

These tougher-leafed or woody specimens are also poisonous and should be avoided in and around your house.

  • Azalea
  • Box
  • Chinaberry tree
  • Horsechestnut
  • Laburnum
  • Oleander
  • Privet
  • Sago Palm
  • Rhododendron
  • Wisteria

You can also visit the Pet Poison Helpline for their Top 10 Plants Poisonous to Pets, and the ASPCA for their extensive list of Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants.

 

My Human Was Nearly Killed Trying to Save my Life- So I Decided to Do Something About It–A Guest Blog Post

Well hello everybody!

Pup Protector dog typing

My name’s Naraku and my tail is wagging with excitement about doing a guest post for Dakota’s Den.

Thanks Dakota and  Caren!

I’m writing this blog today to let you guys know we need your help!

Let me tell you why.

A few years ago my dad Trevor was hit by a car on an early morning walk with me.

It was still dark outside and the car couldn’t see us.  In America, on average, a pedestrian is hit every 8 minutes.

This is a major problem that needs to be addressed.  We have declared war on this issue and made it our mission to spread the word and raise awareness.

You rarely see a human riding a bike at night without some sort of blinking light.  Why is that the standard for bike riders and not for dogs and dog walkers?  It needs to be the standard!

Pup protector logo

 

Our mission is to have a light up product on every dog that walks their human companion at night or early morning. We want to bring awareness to this issue and provide solutions. We hope no one else has to risk their life for their best friend.

To combat this problem we designed a two tier approach:

  1.                  Create a hilarious and amazing video that people will want to share that will raise awareness of this problem.  We use humor to soften a serious issue.
  2.                  Design a solution that people will be happy to put on their dogs and will tell their friends about.

We saw that LED dog products already existed but we couldn’t find companies that were pushing the message.  We don’t want to sell products first and then push the message to sell more products.  We think that is backwards, we want to push the message first and provide a solution to the problem.

Pup Protector dog looking at computer

 

We knew we had to make a good-looking product that people would want to show off so I could get my dog buddies excited to put them on.  When dogs and people are excited about a product, they tell their friends.  These products are not like anything else out there.

We designed a series of high quality LED dog leashes and collars.

These Leashes and collars are stylish, durable, easy to clean and replacing the batteries is simple even without an opposable thumb.

Pup Protector collar

We really need your help to get this off the ground!!  We have 2 weeks left to reach our funding goal!

Please check out this short video we made explaining our product and our mission in more detail.

We ship internationally and anyone can order or even just donate to help us out!  If you don’t want a collar or leash, we have some really cool rewards for donations.

Click below to see what all the buzz is about.

PUP PROTECTOR

See you soon!

-Naraku and the Pup Protector team

Click the link  to help spread the word:  http://bit.ly/PupProtector 

and share this blog post!

 

From Dakota’s Den: It was our pleasure to feature Naraku and the Pup Protector Team. When we heard about this product we felt that it could help save lives and we would love to see it receive the funding it needs to get off the ground! Dakota and I were not compensated for this guest post. We just felt the need to help spread the word!

Plus,  Naraku is awfully darned cute, isn’t he?

April Is Pet First Aid Awareness Month A Guest Blog By Wag’N Enterprises

 

April is Pet First Aid Awareness Month and the leader in pet safety gear and services, Wag’N Enterprises, reminds pet parents that as the seasons change, so do dangers for the family pet. Before looking forward to warm summer weather, springtime often brings out the worst in Mother Nature with tornadoes, flooding and more.

Doggy Bandana

Pet parents should be mindful of certain environmental hazards that could have a devastating effect on pet health. Wag’N Enterprises also encourages creating a pet safety plan this April.

According to Pet Tech®, pet first aid is the immediate care given to a pet that has been injured or suddenly becomes  ill. This includes home care and when necessary veterinary help. Knowing the skills and techniques of pet first aid can mean the difference between life and death; temporary and permanent disability; and expensive veterinarian bills and reasonable home care.

“We want to encourage pet parents to plan ahead for possible pet emergencies by taking small steps that could result in quicker response times during a potential dangerous situation. For example, making sure pet parents understand how to care for an injured pet until it is transported to the local emergency veterinarian can save the pet’s life” said Ines de Pablo, who is a Pet Tech® Certified Master Pet First Aid Instructor and founder of Wag’N Enterprises.

“Because there are only little variances between human and animal mechanisms of injury, pet parents can provide basic first aid for injuries and ailments like bleeding and fractures or heat stroke, seizures, choking management and respiratory distress. Just like us, most incidents can be addressed using a first aid skill,” according to de Pablo. She says initial response and care is vital. “You are your pet’s paramedic during a health related emergency until your pet is transported to the veterinarian. Panic and doubt are not going to help your pet and can both place you in danger and further the pet’s injury,” notes de Pablo.

Pet Passport

Wag’N Enterprises recommends keeping important pet lifesaving phone numbers both in their cell phone registry and displayed on paper copy in a prominent area of the residence and vehicle. Important numbers include their primary veterinarian as well as their emergency veterinarian’s phone number, the ASPCA Poison Control Center Number (888) 426.4435 and the National Poison Control Number (800)222.1222.

Is there an app for that? Wag’N recommends pet parents invest in the PetTech Pet Saver App, available for iPhone, Android phones and Windows 7 phones. The app covers topics such as CPR, heat and cold injuries, choking, snake bites, shock, bleeding protocols, how to restrain and muzzle, what to do in an emergency situation, how to transport an injured pet, the snout-to-tail assessment and more. Each skill includes step-by-step instructions with pictures and narrated audio files. Wag’N warns that this comprehensive pet health app does not circumvent attending a PetTech® Pet First Aid & Care class.

Pet owners and pet care professionals can learn pet life-saving skills nationwide from trained instructors. Pet CPR, first aid and care classes are available in the Washington, D.C. area from Wag’N Enterprises and Ines de Pablo. Attendees can expect to learn pet first aid and care training including: restraint and muzzling, CPR, seizure management, choking management, heat and cold injuries, shock management, bleeding injuries, mitigation and response to poisoning emergencies and much more.

About Wag’N Enterprises:

Founded in 2007, Wag’N Enterprises (http://www.wagnpetsafety.com) offers pet emergency management solutions to service industries, first responders and pet parents to effectively mitigate, prepare for and respond to emergencies that impact pet health and safety. Executive Director of Pet Emergency Management Division Ines de Pablo holds a Master’s Degree in Risk, Crisis & Emergency Management from the prominent George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and has more than a decade of extensive field training experience under her belt. Wag’N Pet Safety Gear is a branded and extensive collection of purposefully designed tools and services giving people and their pets peace of mind in case of an emergency.